Series of data breaches put holiday shoppers at higher risk for fraud

Other than spending too much, one of the biggest risks facing holiday shoppers is the security of their personal and financial information, say cyber security experts.

A year after a pre-Christmas data breach at Target Corp., which affected 40 million debit and credit card records, the chance of another large retailer suffering an attack is highly likely, said Chris Hart, operational risk director for Cincinnati-based First Financial Bancorp. Michaels Stores Inc., Home Depot, JPMorgan Chase Co. and others followed in Target’s wake with their own security lapses in 2014.

But due to the magnitude of compromised data this year, the bigger concern for holiday shoppers than the next hack is how their already stolen information — such as credit card numbers, usernames and passwords — will be used during the busy spending season, Hart said.

“What we’ve seen with the breaches announced by Target and Home Depot and JPMorgan Chase is that we’ve put in jeopardy millions of consumers’ personal information,” he said.

“That loss of personal information is now going to be leveraged by fraudsters who will combine different pieces of that information in opening up unauthorized lines of credit and leveraging it for highly profitable fraudulent endeavors.”

Shoppers should be on high alert for suspicious activity on their bank accounts during the weeks between the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.

The number of breaches tracked by the Identity Theft Resource Center, a nonprofit that provides counseling services to identify theft victims, has risen 25 percent in 2014 from the year before. The counseling center compiles media reports and records obtained from state attorneys general, and found approximately 679 data breaches nationwide so far this year. Those incidents, including Ohio breaches at the cities of Cincinnati and Norwood, have exposed more than 81 million records, according to the nonprofit.

Data breaches are when fraudsters break into computer systems to steal consumer names, payment card numbers, medical records and other information. Personal cellphones, tablets and computers infected by malware due to phishing emails and other scams can also be breached, Hart said.

In fact, Hart says the next big data breach already happened, but the affected company just doesn’t know it yet because it can take weeks to months to detect.

Retail breaches are attention-grabbing, but according to the trade group National Retail Federation, more breaches occur at government agencies (13 percent) and financial institutions (34 percent). According to the association, 10 percent of breaches are at retailers. Another 11 percent are at hotels and restaurants.

The Kroger Co. has to constantly modify its systems because the “bad guys” are highly skilled, said Rachael Betzler, spokeswoman for the Ohio grocery company.

“Data security and privacy is very important to our customers and Kroger pledges to protect the security and privacy of any personal information customers provide to us, including credit card information. Constant vigilance is required to stay ahead of criminals who want to misuse customer payment information,” Betzler said.

This newspaper compiled the following list of tips to help consumers better protect their information, with advice from Hart of First Financial, as well as the Ohio Credit Union League and Ohio Bankers League:

• Online shopping is riskier than brick-and-mortar sales. Online shoppers should be weary whether the website they are browsing is trusted. Today, a lot of imitation websites look like the real thing.

Make sure the hardware and software being used to browse hasn’t been compromised by a virus or malware.

At an online checkout, one of the things to be aware of is that the session with the retailer is secure. The way to tell is to look for ‘https’ in the website address and look for the ‘s’ at the end. If there’s no ‘s,’ don’t add any personal information or credit card number through that website.

• Activate online banking alerts to receive notifications via email or text message of account activity.

• Especially online, pay with a prepaid card or credit card because there are more protections. With credit cards, there’s a zero liability or minimal liability for customers due to fraudulent charges. Also, the Fair Credit Billing Act gives customers the right to dispute credit card charges and temporarily withhold payment while the dispute is investigated.

• Review financial statements to make sure debit and credit card transactions are reconciled accurately. Shoppers are encouraged to keep receipts for all purchases, in-store and online, including order numbers and warranties.

That way, when it comes time to reconcile purchases with a statement, those records are available.

In previous data breaches, criminals have attempted to post a small charge to check for live accounts or to see if a consumer is monitoring an account. Larger fraudulent charges could occur hours, weeks or months later.

• Alert the bank or credit union immediately if fraudulent charges or debits are suspected.

• Take advantage of free credit monitoring services if provided by impacted retailers. While doing so, consumers should deal directly with the retailer to avoid falling prey to phishing scams or other fake credit monitoring offers.

Not all data breaches are created equal, adds Eva Velasquez, chief executive officer of Identity Theft Resource Center, which is based in San Diego, Calif., and was founded in 1999. The inherent risk is different for each disclosure because it depends on what information has been compromised.

“When it’s a matter of simply payment card information, that is generally less difficult to remediate and does less extensive damage,” Velasquez said. “When you have a debit card compromised, there’s potential a thief could go in and clear all your accounts.”

“If there’s a breach where other sensitive personally identifying information is compromised like your Social Security number and date of birth, things of that nature, that can be much more devastating,” she said.

“That actually gives the thief the ability to act as you,” she said. “They can file for government benefits in your name, they can file a false tax return.”

Perhaps most troubling is consumer data are no safer now than in past years, despite increasing reports of security failures, said James Thurston, spokesman for Ohio Bankers League.

“Sadly it isn’t and the reason why not is because the hackers, cyber criminals are getting more sophisticated. We’re talking about organized crime in places like Russia, China and Eastern Europe,” Thurston said.

“The retailers’ defenses have not kept pace with the sophistication of hackers,” he said.

Banks are doing constant real-time monitoring for fraud and suspicious activity, he said. If anything is found that looks suspicious such as a transaction in a foreign country or an amount that is generally out of whack with a customer’s spending profile, they will call a customer to confirm the purchase. In some case, transactions can be blocked in a geographic area or purchases temporarily put on hold until a card is replaced, he said.

Article source: http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/series-of-data-breaches-put-holiday-shoppers-at-hi/njChS/

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Foreign gangs top list of Target data breach suspects



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    One year after thieves infiltrated Target’s cash registers, a website openly sells millions of credit and debit card numbers stolen in that data breach and many others.

    Anyone can log on to the site, rescator.cc, and shop for cards by ZIP code. This illegal marketplace is the most glaring reminder that no one has been brought to justice in the massive theft of Target customer data.

    Federal authorities declined to say anything about their investigation, which is being led by the U.S. Secret Service. Yet cybersecurity professionals have named one person they believe is linked to the stolen card website: a Ukrainian hacker named Andrey Hodirevski.

    Brian Krebs is the blogger who broke the Target breach story and first named Hodirevski a year ago. “He may not be rescator, but it’s pretty clear that he knows the people who are and probably is in touch with them,” Krebs said.

    Two other security pros say Hodirevski almost certainly has a hand in running the site. Dmitry Volkov, head of investigations at Russian computer security company Group-IB, said in an interview that Hodirevski goes by the nickname “rescator” and has for several years been on his company’s radar as a carder, or dealer in stolen payment card info. He said Hodirevski was a main member of DarkLife, a defunct Russian-language hack team.

    “He has a high reputation and credibility among other carders and hackers,” Volkov told the Star Tribune. “He is not just another carder.”

    Mark Lanterman, a former member of the Secret Service Electronic Crimes Task Force and now chief technology officer at Computer Forensic Services in Minnetonka, said the evidence points to Hodirevski.

    “It’s circumstantial, but there’s a lot of it,” Lanterman said. “His website is up and active and going stronger than ever, which is disappointing.”

    Someone at rescator’s instant messenger address responded to Star Tribune inquiries, saying that nobody on his team has heard of Hodirevski and that he’s just “some slim poor guy” that Krebs named. Authorities are looking in a “very different direction,” the person said, declining to specify.

    But all the publicity around the rescator site has made it the No. 1 destination for card thieves, the person boasted.

    Hodirevski has not spoken out publicly, despite his name and photos having been publicized in cyber security reports and magazines such as Bloomberg Businessweek.

    One Ukrainian familiar with him said Hodirevski is living in a flat in Odessa with his grandmother following a previous hacking arrest, and he is being monitored by the Security Service of Ukraine.

    An old school friend in Odessa said Hodirevski has disappeared and there’s no point looking. He’s probably in Russia, said the friend, Alex Zhimalov: “If he wants to be invisible — he will be.”

    Illicit marketplace

    In a conference room at his Minnetonka offices, Lanterman logs in to rescator.cc. Over the past year, he’s found information on the site from tens of thousands of cards stolen from Target stores linked to Minnesota ZIP codes. This fall, he found information from at least 12,000 cards stolen from Home Depot, all linked to Minnesota ZIP codes and selling for $9 to $52 each.

    The shop operates in the open now, he said.

    Lanterman believes that rescator sells the software that hackers have used to break into retailers’ point-of-sale computers. Then buyers customize it for victims such as Target, and others install it and do the rest of the dirty work, and give rescator the stolen card information to sell.

    Watching traffic on rescator.cc tests Lanterman’s patience.


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    Beth Israel to pay $100000 fine over data breach




    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has agreed to pay a $100,000 fine and improve the security of patient information after a 2012 data breach left thousands of patients’ details vulnerable.

    The breach happened when an “unauthorized person” stole an unencrypted laptop from a doctor’s office. The computer contained health or personal information, such as names and Social Security numbers, of nearly 4,000 patients and employees.

    Continue reading below

    Attorney General Martha Coakley’s office said doctors at Beth Israel Deaconess failed to follow policies to protect patient information. The hospital also failed to notify patients about the breach, as required by law, for several months, Coakley said.

    Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer at Beth Israel Deaconess, said the hospital has since improved its security procedures.

    “After this incident, we worked closely with the federal and state governments, as well as security industry experts, to ensure that [the hospital] adopts state-of-the-art security policies and technologies,” Halamka said in a statement. “Every device we purchase is encrypted before it is used, and every employee must attest on an annual basis that his or her personal devices are also encrypted.”

    Encryption is a process of scrambling information so it can’t be read by unauthorized people.

    Coakley reached settlements over similar data privacy violations with South Shore Hospital in Weymouth in 2012 and Women and Infants Hospital in Providence earlier this year. South Shore was fined $750,000, and Women and Infants had to pay $150,000.

    Priyanka Dayal McCluskey can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @priyanka_dayal.

    Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2014/11/22/beth-israel-pay-fine-over-data-breach/c7PKgVfKNXjUOTuvJkpcSP/story.html

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    Corporate Call for National Data Breach Standards

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    Article source: http://www.corpcounsel.com/top-stories/id=1202677101209/Corporate-Call-for-National-Data-Breach-Standards?mcode=1202615619917&curindex=0

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    Data Breach: Windows Live and Playstation Network Hacker "DerpTrolling …

    Updated: November 22, 2014 at 12:36 am CET.

    A hacker group by the name of DerpTrolling announced today that they broke into the Playstation Network, 2K Games and Windows Live to make off with a massive amount of login information as well as 500,000 credit card details.

    As a warning shot, DerpTrolling posted a Pastebin of over 5,000 different emails and passwords, accompanied by the message that “nothing is safe.”

    The document above shows usernames and passwords of the victims; 2,131 PSN users, 1,473 Windows Live users and 2000 2K Game users. It does not show any credit card data.

    According to CNET, a DerpTrolling member said that the group decided to change tactics after they found themselves not seen as a serious threat.

    “We were advised by one of our friends over at RedHack to make adjustments in our operations. A show of force from us, would be an attack on 2K that would be very similar to our attacks on Blizzard. Like I said, DerpTrolling in no way wants to harm our children by leaking such damaging data. It’s only a warning to the companies.”

    It’s easy to check up to see if you may be one of the many affected by the attack by utilizing CTRL+F and finding your email or password.

    “We have 800,000 from 2K and 500,000 credit card data. In all of our raids we have a total of around 7 million usernames and passwords. We have around 2 million Comcast accounts, 620,000 Twitter accounts, 1.2 million credentials belonging to the CIA domain, 200,000 Windows Live accounts, 3 million Facebook, 1.7 million EA origins accounts, etc.”

    Furthermore, the member claimed told CNET that DerpTrolling is behind some of the most famous hackings in the past few years, touting their achievements.

    “You heard about Anonymous knocking the entire .Mil domain offline? Well that was us! You hear of RedHack launching DDoS attacks against Turkey’s government? That was us as well! You heard about LulzSec knocking gaming servers and websites offline? Well that was us too! And that was us who knocked Syria’s internet offline earlier this year. DerpTrolling really has many forms, most people only see the Gaming side of us! We can be very serious hackers.”

    Bitcoin Users Avoid Windows Live and Playstation Network Stolen Financial Information

    It seems that every few months another group of hackers steal sensitive financial information from stores and merchants. The Playstation Network and Windows Live platforms are just two drops in the bucket compared to the big picture. It’s unfortunate for those that suffer identity theft and credit card fraud, but in the end it exposes that the current system in place has serious vulnerabilities.

    Bitcoin may still be in the early stages, but stealing information doesn’t work the same way in this financial realm. Someone can’t take your public key and pull from your account; they need the private key as well. Now that multi-signature accounts are gaining popularity, it’s getting harder and hard to steal sensitive financial information.

    Also read: Coinkite Announces Multi-Signature Support Expansion for up to 15 Members

    It’s expected that all companies affected will review their data and try to implement stronger security measures, but CCN advises anyone with a mere inkling of fraud should change their passwords, notify their credit card companies and banks. They should also take a look at the security measures taken by digital currency users and try to work them into their personal lives.

    Images from Shutterstock.

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    Article source: https://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/data-breach-windows-live-playstation-network-hacker-group-derptrolling-claims-500000-stolen-credit-card-details/

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    Corporate Call for National Data Breach Standards

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    Article source: http://www.nationallawjournal.com/legaltimes/home/id=1202677163792/Corporate-Call-for-National-Data-Breach-Standards?mcode=1202615432600&curindex=0&back=NLJ

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    Beth Israel fined $100000 for patient data breach




    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center agreed to pay $100,000 to settle a complaint by the Massachusetts attorney general’s office that its lax data security led to the theft of personal information of about 4,000 patients and employees.

    In May 2012, a physician’s unattended laptop was stolen from his desk at the hospital. The laptop contained health information of 3,796 patients and Beth Israel employees, as well as personal information, such as Social Security numbers, of 194 other Massachusetts residents. The attorney general’s office argued the hospital’s lack of security and failure to encrypt patient data was against the law.

    Continue reading below

    “The healthcare industry’s increased reliance on technology makes it more important than ever that providers ensure patients’ personal information and protected health information is secure,” said Attorney General Martha Coakley.

    Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer at Beth Israel Deaconess, said the hospital has since improved its security procedures.

    “After this incident, we worked closely with the federal and state governments, as well as security industry experts, to ensure that [the hospital] adopts state-of-the-art security policies and technologies,” Halamka said in a statement. “Every device we purchase is encrypted before it is used, and every employee must attest on an annual basis that his or her personal devices are also encrypted.”

    Beth Israel is not the first hospital to be penalized for poor data security by Coakley’s office. Earlier this year, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island agreed to pay $150,000, and South Shore Hospital settled a suit by the Attorney General for $750,000 in 2012.

    Jack Newsham can be reached at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @TheNewsHam.

    Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2014/11/21/beth-israel-fined-for-patient-data-breach/W8LT4a0gN6NMT93KtEDq7H/story.html

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    USPS draws ire of Congress over data breach response

    Members of the USPS testified before a House subcommittee Wednesday, drawing criticism over the delay in its breach notification to impacted employees.

    The United States Postal Service (USPS) was scolded by members of a congressional subcommittee in a hearing over its response to the recent data breach that impacted its network and employees.

    Members of the USPS testified before a House subcommittee Wednesday and were questioned over its response and notification time related to the incident which affected more than 800,000 USPS employees.

    “I am very disappointed in the way you handled this…you have to be more forthcoming,” Rep. Stephen Lynch (D.-Mass.) told testifying members of the USPS.

    The U.S Computer Emergency Readiness Team first detected the breach on Sept. 11 and alerted the USPS, however, it wasn’t until Oct. 16 where it learned that data was indeed compromised. On November 4 it was confirmed that data was stolen, according to testimony by Randy Miskanic, vice president of secure digital solutions at the USPS.

    Employee information compromised includes names, addresses, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, in addition to beginning and end dates of employment and emergency contact information.

    USPS employees were notified of the incident on Nov. 10, nearly two months after it was first discovered, but by then news of the breach had already made headlines around the nation.

    “Over the entire period it was necessary to understand the scope and the impact,” Miskanic said in response to questions over the delay in notifying affected individuals. “Once we learned on October 16 that there might have been some data taken, we needed to learn what that was and reconstruct it forensically. Over that period it was also very imperative that we initiated remediation and mitigation activity.”

    Miskanic’s explanation quickly prompted Lynch to respond to the notification tactics utilized by the USPS, which he believed put the employee data further at risk.

    “The way this should work is, as soon as you know that a file has been compromised and it contains personally identifiable information…that employee should be notified,” Lynch said. “If we go with your plan, a U.S. government agency could have the Social Security numbers compromised and you’ll decide based on your own interests, when the employee [information] has been stolen. That doesn’t work for the American people.”

    The American Postal Workers Union recently filed charges to the National Labor Relations Board against the USPS for failing to bargain with the group over the impact of the breach. They believe they should have been a part of the discussion on how to address the incident.

    Article source: http://www.scmagazine.com/congress-criticizes-usps-data-breach-response/article/384520/

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    Will Black Friday Spawn Another Massive Data Breach?

    The “official” kick-off for the holiday shopping season comes next week on Black Friday, and probably not coincidentally, last year’s massive data breach at Target Corp. (NYSE: TGT) reportedly began on November 27, just two days before Black Friday. That breach has cost the company $158 million through the first three quarters of the year, and it also cost Target’s CEO and CIO their jobs.

    The odds of another such attack this year are better than even. Data security expert Brian Krebs says, “Any retailers that are still handling unencrypted credit card data on their networks remain an attractive and lucrative target for attackers.” You have been warned.

    The latest report from the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) reveals that there has been a record total of 679 data breaches recorded through November 18, 2014, and more than 81 million records have been exposed. The previous record high was set at 662 in 2010, and this year’s total to date is about 25% higher year-over-year.

    The total number of data breaches increased by 13 in the week and the medical/health care sector continues to post the largest percentage of the total breaches, 42.4% (288) out of the total of 679. The number of records exposed in these breaches totaled 7.79 million.

    On the basis of the number of records exposed, the business sector accounts for 64.7 million breached records in 218 incidents.

    The number of banking/credit/financial breaches remained flat at 41 for the year to date and involved 1.18 million records, some 6% of the total and 1.5% of the number of records exposed.

    Since 2005 there have been 4,925 data breaches tabulated, involving nearly 673.5 million exposed records.

    ALSO READ: The Safest Cities in America


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    Article source: http://247wallst.com/technology-3/2014/11/21/will-black-friday-spawn-another-massive-data-breach/

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    Customers Aren’t Worried About Data Breaches [Infographic]

    2014-20-November-yawn.jpgHere’s good news for every company that’s careless with personally identifiable information: Your customers apparently don’t care.

    A new study by global IT association ISACA shows that consumers haven’t changed their shopping behaviors despite a year of retail data breaches — worrisome, the organization maintains, especially with the shopaholic trifecta of Thanksgiving Day, Black Friday and Cyber Monday is just a week away.

    It’s not that consumers are unaware of the problem. According to the 2014 ISACA IT Risk/Reward Barometer, almost all US consumers (94 percent) have read or heard about major retailer data breaches in the past year. But while three-fourths of those surveyed claim those data breaches have increased their concerns about their personal data privacy, few are doing anything about it.

    What? Me Worry?

    Fewer than half have changed an online password or PIN code (45 percent), made fewer online purchases using mobile devices (15 percent) or shopped less frequently at one or more of the retailers that experienced a data breach (28 percent), the study found. 

    As one woman told CMSWire yesterday, “I don’t believe there is any privacy online anymore so I’ve essentially given up.”

    ISACA’s IT Risk/Reward Barometer examines attitudes and behaviors related to the risks and rewards of key technology trends, including the Internet of Things, big data and bring your own device (BYOD) policies. The 2014 Barometer consists of two components: a survey of 1,646 ISACA members who are IT and business professionals around the world, including 452 in the US, and a survey of more than 4,000 consumers in four countries, including 1,209 in the US.

    Robert Stroud, international president of ISACA and vice president of innovation and strategy at New York City-based CA Technologies, said this year’s study confirms there’s a “huge gap” between people’s concerns about protecting their data privacy and security versus the actions they take. While that cavalier attitude may be comforting to companies and brands with inadequate or outdated data security policies and little or no information governance, Stroud disagrees. 

    Reduce the Risks

    “Businesses need to address this gap by aggressively educating both customers and employees about how they can help reduce the risk or minimize the impact of data breaches or hacks,” he said, adding that ISACA recently established the Cybersecurity Nexus (CSX) as a resource enterprises can turn to for security advice.

    ISACA recommends obvious but too often ignored strategies: Consumers should protect their personal information with strong passwords unique to each account, protect their devices with current security software and verify that online transactions are secure by looking for a padlock icon displayed in the browser.

    Here’s what else the ISACA report found, visualized by CMSWire’s Jackie Jordan.

    2014-20-November-InfoGraphic-Risk-Reward

    Title image by Robert S. Donovan  (Flickr) via a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

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    Article source: http://www.cmswire.com/cms/big-data/customers-arent-worried-about-data-breaches-infographic-027265.php

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