Archive for January, 2017

EDITORIAL Mercedes ISD personal data breach baffling, inexcusable

The accidental release of sensitive personnel data of nearly a thousand employees who work for the Mercedes Independent School District is a security breach that school administrators should not take lightly.

How the W-2 forms for 950 workers were compromised is baffling, and inexcusable.

Mercedes ISD Superintendent Dr. Daniel Treviño Jr. blamed the security lapse on an oversight and told the Mid-Valley Town Crier’s editor, Michael Rodriguez, that sensitive information within the documents — such as Social Security numbers and dates of birth — should now be considered compromised.

Apparently the data was released by the district’s payroll office upon receipt of an email that an employee there thought was a legitimate information request relating to the preparation of W-2 forms for 2016.

That certainly is no consolation to the employees who now must monitor their Social Security statements and other documents for years to come. Hopefully no nefarious usage will come of this breach, but nevertheless it means added effort and agony for hundreds of Valley families.

It also should serve as a warning to all of us to be careful with email requests and to safeguard our most precious and personal data.

Article source: http://www.themonitor.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-mercedes-isd-personal-data-breach-baffling-inexcusable/article_7bae625e-e74f-11e6-add5-2b93295ee7f3.html

,

No Comments

NY Attorney General Settles Acer Data Breach Suit

New York State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman has settled a data breach case for Acer Service Corporation. The suit stemmed from a June 2016 data breach in
which 35,000 customers had their private data stolen. The data included: email addresses, credit card data, as well as user names and passwords. Acer’s failure to protect customer
information for almost a year resulted in a $115,000 fine, as well as the requirement to enhance data security practices.

Article source: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/294112/ny-attorney-general-settles-acer-data-breach-suit.html

,

No Comments

How to Protect Yourself From Soaring Data Breach Crimes ‒ Money …

A new report reveals that 2016 set an all-time high for the number of data records exposed by breaches. Don’t forget these overlooked tips for staying safe.

Across the globe in 2016, more than 4 billion records — including sensitive medical records, website usernames and passwords, credit card information and Social Security numbers — were stolen and exposed during 4,149 reported data breaches.

Although that’s an all-time high — the previous record was 822 million records exposed in 2013 — the hacking problem is likely much worse than we even know.

Inga Goddijn, executive vice president of Risk Based Security, which issued the new data breach report, tells NBC News:

“The number of records compromised just went completely off the charts. And as staggering as they are, our numbers probably underestimate the actual criminal activity that’s taking place.” 

Goddijn says businesses were the targets of more than half (55 percent) of the data breaches in 2016, although government agencies and medical institutions were also targeted by cybercriminals.

Fortunately, there are ways to fight back and protect your data. Some are well-known, such as using multiple passwords and changing them often, as well as avoiding clicking on suspicious online links.

However, others are overlooked. For example, it’s important to secure confidential documents offline as well as online. As we wrote in the story “Fear Data Breaches and ID Theft? 10 Steps to Protect Yourself“:

[T]hose papers you need to keep — generally, paperwork with original signatures or raised seals, like wills, contracts, titles and deeds — should be stored in a locked and fireproof safe in your house. Scan them to provide a backup.

Another good tip is to avoid speaking to telemarketers. Read the story linked above to find out why silence is golden. 

Some people are so concerned about data theft that they pay a service to protect them from identity theft. But is that a wise idea?

Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson says there are three good reasons to think twice before forking over the cash. Read more in ” “Ask Stacy: Should I Pay for Identity Theft Protection and Credit Monitoring?

Have you been the victim of a data breach or identity theft? Share your experiences below or on Facebook.

Article source: http://www.moneytalksnews.com/how-protect-yourself-from-epidemic-data-breaches/

,

No Comments

Cost of a data breach soars to 20% of revenue as hacking goes ‘classic’ and corporate

FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites

Cisco’s annual cybersecurity report outlines the old and new attack methods threatening businesses today.

Revealing the ever-growing cost of a data breach, over one-third of companies experienced a huge 20% loss in revenue following a breach in 2016. This loss was amplified by similar hits to customer base, reputation and business opportunities.

Polling 3,000 chief security officers worldwide, Cisco’s 10th annual cybersecurity report found that 50% of breached companies faced public scrutiny after a breach. Operations and finance systems were the most affected, though the cost of a data breach was not isolated to financial loss.

22% of breached organisations in 2016 lost customers, with 40% of companies seeing 20% of their customer base abandon them in the wake of a security incident. 23% of breached organisations lost  business opportunities, with 42% losing more than 20%.

The chief security officers surveyed admitted that budget constraints, poor compatibility of systems, and a lack of trained talent were the biggest barriers to advancing their security posture, with the leaders blaming increasingly complex environments for the gaps which allow hackers into their organisations.

65% of organisations were found to use up to 50 security products, thus highlighting the overcrowded and complex environments which are developing in security departments. These gaps and barriers were found to be severely constraining security departments, with only 56% of security alerts being able to be investigated on any given day.

However, although defenders are cost of a data breach - hackingdeploying varying different methods and technologies to secure businesses, the attackers were found to be using tried and tested methods. Leading a resurgence of “classic” attack vectors, the use of adware and email spam were classic methods effectively deployed in 2016 – with the latter at levels not seen since 2010. Spam was found to account for 65% of email, with eight to 10% identified as malicious.

In a growing trend of hackers becoming more corporate, the report highlighted some of the new business models used by hackers. Attacks were found to mirror corporate hierarchies, with certain malvertising campaigns employing brokers (or “gates”) that act as middle managers, masking malicious activity. This gave hackers greater speed and the ability to maintain their operational space, while also evading detection.

READ: Hackers Incorporated: Looking into the business model of criminal CEOs

However, it was not all bad news, large exploit kits including Angler, Nuclear and Neutrino disappeared in 2016, although smaller players did rush to fill the gap.

Good news was also found in the time to detection metric, with Cisco tracking the positive progress in reducing “time to detection” (TTD), the window of time between a compromise and the detection of a threat. Cisco successfully lowered the TTD from a median of 14 hours in early 2016 to as low as six hours in the last half of the year. This figure is based on opt-in telemetry gathered from Cisco security products deployed worldwide.

“One of our key metrics highlighted in the 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report is the ‘time to detection’ – the time it takes to find and mitigate against malicious activity. We have brought that number down to as low as six hours,” said David Ulevitch, Vice President/General Manager, Security Business, Cisco.

“A new metric – the ‘time to evolve’ – looked at how quickly threat actors changed their attacks to mask their identity. With these and other measures gleaned from report findings, and working with organizations to automate and integrate their threat defense, we can better help them minimize financial and operational risk and grow their business.”

Article source: http://www.cbronline.com/news/cybersecurity/breaches/cost-of-a-data-breach-soars-20-revenue-hacking-goes-classic-corporate/

,

No Comments

Every Scotty’s Brewhouse employee affected by data breach; scammer gets copy of all W-2 forms


scottysbrewhouse

File photo.

scottysbrewhouse

File photo.

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.– Officials at Scotty’s Brewhouse are working to inform thousands of employees across the company about an email data breach, leaking employees’ W-2 forms to an unknown suspect.

Company officials called IMPD Monday afternoon to report the breach, which apparently resulted from an email phishing scam.

According to the police report, an individual posing as company CEO Scott Wise sent an email to a payroll account employee. The email requested the employee to send all 4,000 employees W-2 forms in PDF form.

Chris Martin, director of HR/Payroll for the company, told police the email did not really come from Wise. However, the payroll account employee did email all 4,000 W-2 forms to the unknown individual.

The report says Martin contacted the IRS to inform the agency of the breach. The IRS recommended Martin also file a report with IMPD.

Scotty’s Brewhouse officials are now in the process of informing all employees, and providing them with precautionary measures to take in order to protect their financial and personal information.

The incident appears to match the description of an email phishing scheme the IRS issued warnings about last year. This scheme involves scammers posing as company executives to request financial and personal information on employees.

The IRS has online tutorials on the proper steps to take if you have become the victim of identity theft or your personal information has been leaked.  Those steps can be found here.

Scotty’s Brewhouse is expected to release a statement about the incident Tuesday evening.

Article source: http://fox59.com/2017/01/31/every-scottys-brewhouse-employee-affected-by-data-breach-scammer-gets-copy-of-all-w-2-forms/

,

No Comments

Voices Protecting your advisory firm from a data breach

Maintaining client data on someone else’s remote servers — in the cloud — seems like a good alternative to storing information on local hard drives.

But is cloud storage the most secure way to keep sensitive files away from hackers?

Undoubtedly, for large wealth management firms with big budgets and client bases, it makes sense. Most small money managers, however, can’t afford a sophisticated IT staff to guard key data, regardless where or how it’s stored. And therein lies a huge cyber security problem.

Without proper IT oversight, even minor slips can lead to a firm’s fall. For example, employees may never change their passwords, or those passwords are easy to crack. Staff may access client data from laptops out in the world via insecure devices over open Wi-Fi networks. Even leaving a laptop open in a coffee shop, or checking an account from a public computer, could create a major vulnerability.

ANYTHING’S A MAJOR VULNERABLITY
What’s a major vulnerability? Imagine everything from brokerage account numbers to passwords to addresses, family names, dates of birth, driver’s license numbers, mothers’ maiden names and social security numbers available to anyone and everyone in cyberspace.

And think of all the things a hacker can do with that information: steal a client’s identity, hold your firm’s data for ransom or simply drain funded accounts, not to mention old-fashioned, non-digital crimes such as home burglary or even kidnapping.

These kinds of risks arise whenever your data resides on someone else’s data systems — public, private or hybrid — housed somewhere, whether a small off-site system or maybe on the big ones, Salesforce’s servers, Amazon Web Services, VMware or Microsoft’s Azure or 365.

Yes, your data may seem less at-risk off-site — in the care of a tech behemoth with a known brand name — its location creates a new set of security issues nowadays.

Consider: How secure is the cloud hosting company? How vetted are their employees? Are they adept enough to ward off a mini-bestiary of hacker tools, such as worms, Trojan horses, and viruses that can linger for months, perhaps years, in cloud systems?

What about the alphabet soup of DDOS (distributed denial-of-service attacks), RFID (radio frequency identification attacks and DRAM (dynamic access memory attacks)?

Yvonne Kanner, president and COO of the Fiduciary Network

WHO IS LIABLE FOR BREACHES?

Perhaps the biggest issue for a planner, aside from the cyber attacks, is determining who is liable in the event of a breach. The cloud service provider? Or the planner? The SEC is telling planners that they are responsible for overseeing the providers, and that is quite a heavy lift, especially for smaller firms, who may lack technology skills.

Then there are the regulatory contradictions. For instance, regulators ask that firms protect and keep private clients’ information. They also ask for a disaster recovery plan. Sounds reasonable, right? But access, business continuity, and privacy are not easy to manage together. It means that a small firm has to house data in multiple locations that they don’t fully control.

The only way to 100% guarantee the protection of the data from hackers is not to have it connected to the internet — keep it on-site. But then there are issues of physical security instead of cyber security, and, besides, it’s just not realistic.

FIXING THE PROBLEM

A partial solution may be to stay off cloud systems, as much as possible.

Alternatively, if you have to use cloud-based solutions, at a minimum make sure you:

1) Review the contract with regulatory counsel.
2) Ensure you are comfortable with the providers privacy and confidentiality provisions,
3) Understand how the provider will notify you if your information has been breached (how quickly are they obligated to notify you and how).
4) Follow your providers’ insurance coverage and remediation plans for breaches
5) Document in the agreement the process by which your data will be deleted in the event you decide to fire the provider (including the types of documentation the provider will deliver certifying that your data has been wiped from servers.

Remember, once you have been known to have a data breach, your entire business may already be destroyed. Who wants to work with a financial planner who has had a breach? It suggests the exact opposite of the trust that you seek to project.

Bottom line: for planners, it pays to educate yourself. Read the fine print, consider insurance and learn the best practices when it comes to client data security.


Article

Structural impediments to growth

Partner Insights
Sponsor Content From:



Article source: http://www.financial-planning.com/opinion/protecting-your-advisory-firm-from-a-data-breach

,

No Comments

How to Protect Yourself From Soaring Data Breach Crimes

A new report reveals that 2016 set an all-time high for the number of data records exposed by breaches. Don’t forget these overlooked tips for staying safe.

Across the globe in 2016, more than 4 billion records — including sensitive medical records, website usernames and passwords, credit card information and Social Security numbers — were stolen and exposed during 4,149 reported data breaches.

Although that’s an all-time high — the previous record was 822 million records exposed in 2013 — the hacking problem is likely much worse than we even know.

Inga Goddijn, executive vice president of Risk Based Security, which issued the new data breach report, tells NBC News:

“The number of records compromised just went completely off the charts. And as staggering as they are, our numbers probably underestimate the actual criminal activity that’s taking place.” 

Goddijn says businesses were the targets of more than half (55 percent) of the data breaches in 2016, although government agencies and medical institutions were also targeted by cybercriminals.

Fortunately, there are ways to fight back and protect your data. Some are well-known, such as using multiple passwords and changing them often, as well as avoiding clicking on suspicious online links.

However, others are overlooked. For example, it’s important to secure confidential documents offline as well as online. As we wrote in the story “Fear Data Breaches and ID Theft? 10 Steps to Protect Yourself“:

[T]hose papers you need to keep — generally, paperwork with original signatures or raised seals, like wills, contracts, titles and deeds — should be stored in a locked and fireproof safe in your house. Scan them to provide a backup.

Another good tip is to avoid speaking to telemarketers. Read the story linked above to find out why silence is golden. 

Some people are so concerned about data theft that they pay a service to protect them from identity theft. But is that a wise idea?

Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson says there are three good reasons to think twice before forking over the cash. Read more in ” “Ask Stacy: Should I Pay for Identity Theft Protection and Credit Monitoring?

Have you been the victim of a data breach or identity theft? Share your experiences below or on Facebook.

Article source: http://www.moneytalksnews.com/how-protect-yourself-from-epidemic-data-breaches/

,

No Comments

3 Things Companies Must Do Before A Data Breach

It’s important to plan ahead for when you’re attacked, and these tips will help you get ready.

 More on Security Live at Interop ITX

As attacks become more complex, more damaging, and more frequent than ever, the quality of your response becomes critical to limiting the impact. In fact, a strong incident response (IR) function saves an average of $400,000 in damages per data breach, according to the Ponemon Institute, in research sponsored by IBM Resilient. 

The new Cyber Resilient Organization study by the Ponemon Institute showed security teams are striving to build stronger and more proactive incident IR programs — but clearly, they have some serious challenges. Two-thirds of IT and security professionals aren’t confident in their organization’s cyber resilience. And three-quarters of them don’t have a cybersecurity IR plan in place that’s applied consistently across their organization.

The study also suggested key guidance for increasing cyber resilience: improved planning and preparation. Successfully resolving and mitigating a cyberattack requires fast, intelligent, and decisive action. You need to have a plan in place to know what to do before an attack happens, and, as importantly, practice executing it.

When it comes to the plan, here are three things to include and tips on how to prepare before an attack occurs.

1. Identify and Involve Internal Collaborators
IR is an organization-wide priority, with many business units playing a critical role in successfully resolving an attack. Legal, HR, and finance teams must be involved to ensure compliance with regulations, and understand liabilities in case of a breach or when you’re facing an insider attack. In the worst cases, the marketing department and the organization’s executives may need to step in to address the media.

During an incident, security leaders should coordinate with these parties as needed, providing specific guidance on the nature of the incident, what’s being asked of them, and when they need to act. For example, in the case of a ransomware attack, who makes the decision whether to pay the ransom or determine the business value of the data being ransomed?

Before an incident occurs, involve these groups in the IR planning process. Get their input early — and let them know what will be expected of them. It’s also smart to include them in simulations and exercises, to ensure they’re primed to act when needed.

2. Enable Investigation into the Full Scope of the Attack
This might seem like an obvious step, but in today’s world of advanced persistent threats and targeted campaigns, truly understanding the extent of an attack can be difficult. 

The emergence of threat intelligence gives security teams a strong weapon in gaining context about incidents. By leveraging the indicators of compromise; tactics, techniques, and procedures; and other artifacts of an incident, analysts can discern if an attack is a singular incident or part of a larger campaign against you. Threat intelligence also helps you understand the identity of the adversary and their goal: Is the adversary a single attacker, part of an organized crime group, or a state actor? Is the target intellectual property, customer information, or employee information? By understanding these aspects of the attacks, you can more accurately determine the scope of your challenge and whom to involve.

3. Map Out the Regulatory Ramifications
The regulatory impact of a breach can be one of the costlier aspects of a successful attack. It’s no surprise, but the Ponemon Cost of a Data Breach study showed that more heavily regulated industries,  including healthcare and finance, incurred higher data breach costs.

The challenge boils down to two factors: complex and inconsistent regulations, and tight deadlines. For any incident, it’s important to get your legal team involved early, and provide team members with the details they need to make fast and accurate decisions.

Being prepared for this is going to be even more critical in the future. The EU’s impending data breach law — the General Data Protection Regulation — is among the widest-sweeping global privacy regulations we’ve seen. It doesn’t come into effect until 2018, but smart organizations are preparing, planning, and assessing their ability to comply today.

Incident response is the most human-centric security function,  more so than prevention and detection. Bringing people process and technology together as a cohesive whole when needed is critical.

By taking steps today to develop, practice, and refine IR processes, teams will be much better able to successfully manage and mitigate the damage when they inevitably occur.

Related Content:

John Bruce is a seasoned executive with a successful track record of building companies that deliver innovative customer solutions, particularly in security products and services. Previously Chairman and CEO of Quickcomm, an Inc. 500 international company headquartered in New … View Full Bio

Article source: http://www.darkreading.com/3-things-companies-must-do-before-a-data-breach/a/d-id/1327987

,

No Comments

Data breach costs exceed 20% of revenue

Digitisation danger

Changes in the technology landscape, led by digitisation, are creating opportunities for cyber criminals, the report said. Nearly a third of employee-introduced, third-party cloud applications that were intended to open up new business opportunities and increase efficiencies were categorised as high risk and created significant security concerns.

And while attackers continue to use time-tested techniques, they are also employing new approaches that mirror the “middle management” structure of their corporate targets. Old-fashioned adware ‑ software that downloads advertising without user permission – continued to prove successful, infecting 75% of organisations investigated.

Although there was a drop in the use of large exploit kits such as Angler, Nuclear and Neutrino that were target by law enforcement in 2016, the report said smaller players rushed in to fill the gap.

The report revealed that just 56% of security alerts are investigated and less than half of legitimate alerts remediated, noting that while defenders are confident in their tools, they are battling complexity and manpower challenges, leaving gaps of time and space for attackers to use their advantage.

“In 2017, cyber is business, and business is cyber – that requires a different conversation, and very different outcomes,” said John Stewart, senior vice-president, chief security and trust officer at Cisco.

“Relentless improvement is required and that should be measured via efficacy, cost and well-managed risk. The 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report demonstrates, and I hope justifies, answers to our struggles on budget, personnel, innovation and architecture,” he said.

Article source: http://www.computerweekly.com/news/450412041/Data-breach-costs-exceed-20-of-revenue

,

No Comments

Yahoo Topped Record List of Data Breaches in 2016, Report Finds

NEWS ANALYSIS: Yahoo, others make 2016 a record year for data breaches, report finds; Facebook strengthens user account access with security keys; Office 365 advanced threat protection warns against unsafe email links; and there’s more.

  • Latest Videos

Yahoo Topped Record List of Data Breaches in 2016, Report Finds

NEWS ANALYSIS: Yahoo, others make 2016 a record year for data breaches, report finds; Facebook…

HPI Recalls 101,000 Notebook PCs With Defective Batteries

DAILY VIDEO: HPI Has Samsung-like problem: overheating batteries; iPhone production volume slid 11.5…

LinkedIn Executive Kevin Scott Named Microsoft CTO

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft promotes LinkedIn’s Kevin Scott to CTO; Google says new Chromebook models to…

Samsung Says Battery Manufacturing Flaws Caused Galaxy Note7 Fires

DAILY VIDEO: Samsung reveals cause of Galaxy Note7 battery fires, explosions; Apple latest to ‘pile…

LinkedIn Brings Mobile Experience to Social Network Desktop UI

DAILY VIDEO: LinkedIn adding mobile look to social network desktop experience; Avaya bankruptcy sends…

Microsoft Offering Windows 10 Upgrades Through Subscriber Service

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft to dole out free Windows 10 upgrades via subscriber service; Oracle patches…

Labor Department Lawsuit Claims Oracle Discriminates in Hiring, Pay

DAILY VIDEO: U.S. Labor Department sues Oracle, claiming hiring, pay infractions; Red Hat OpenShift…

FTC Lawsuit Charges Qualcomm With Antitrust Violations

DAILY VIDEO: FTC sues Qualcomm, alleging Patent Antitrust Violations; HPE Invests $650M to Acquire…

‘ShadowBrokers’ Hacker Group Releases NSA Exploits After Auction Fails

DAILY VIDEO: Hacker group ‘ShadowBrokers’ release NSA Exploits after auction fails; Google…

IBM Introduces All-Flash Storage Systems for Cognitive Workloads

DAILY VIDEO: IBM unveils all-Flash storage for cognitive workloads; Microsoft Power BI reports go…

Intel Processors, Storage Enhancements Set New Dell Servers Apart

Dell’s latest Intel-based PowerEdge servers bring new levels of operational efficiency and…

Dell PowerEdge R630: Incredible Density Across a Range of Resources

The Dell PowerEdge R630 is a mainstream 2S/1U rack server that delivers incredible density across a…

Save on Operating Costs for Scale-Out Workloads

With the introduction of the Dell PowerEdge FM 120×4, Dell and Intel are bringing to market a server…

Dell PowerEdge R730xd: Storage Density for Clouds, Big Data and More

The Dell PowerEdge R730xd, also based on Intel Xeon processors, is one of the world’s densest…

Dell PowerEdge T630: Versatility for ROBO Environments and More

The Dell PowerEdge T630 is a mainstream 2S/5U rack-mount tower server with a versatile mix of…

Introduction to the 13th Generation Dell PowerEdge Servers video

Dell’s latest generation of Intel-based PowerEdge servers has the power and flexibility to solve all…

Meet Some of the 13th Generation Dell PowerEdge Servers video

Dell’s latest Intel-based PowerEdge servers bring new levels of operational efficiency and…

Management Features of the 13th Generation Dell PowerEdge Servers video

Today’s businesses need to innovate to compete. If your IT talent is spending too much time…

Innovative Features in the 13th Generation Dell PowerEdge Servers video

Dell PowerEdge servers powered by Intel processors include a number of innovative features designed…

Virtualization, Convergence and Cloud with Dell PowerEdge Servers video

Agility is a competitive edge that Dell’s PowerEdge servers can deliver thanks to dense, storage…

Today’s topics include a security report that shows the theft of 1.5 billion Yahoo user records helped make 2016 a record year for data breaches, Facebook’s announcement that it is implementing Security Key technology, the Office 365 Threat Detection feature that warns users of unsafe email links and Platform9’s new managed Kubernetes service to enable serverless computing for users.

The reported breaches at Yahoo exposed approximately 1.5 billion records, which along with a handful of other immense breaches, made 2016 a record year for data loss, according to a report released by security firm Risk Based Security on Jan. 25.

The report collected and sifted through 4,149 confirmed breach reports from a variety of sources, finding that at least 4.2 billion records were potentially compromised in 2016, up from approximately 1.0 billion in 2013, the previous record.

While the total number of reported data breaches held steady over the past few years, the average breach exposed more records than previous years, Inga Goddijn, executive vice president at Risk Based Security, told eWEEK.

Facebook announced on Jan. 26 that it is supporting Security Key technology in an effort to improve security and reduce the risk of user account takeovers.

With an increasing volume of data breaches that have leaked user passwords, the need for strong authentication methods, beyond just a simple username and password, has become increasingly apparent.

The new U2F support provides the option for Facebook users to use a USB security key that is plugged into a device, in order to gain secure access. The U2F standard was first announced by the FIDO Alliance in December 2014 as a method to help improve strong authentication.

With a U2F security key, a user does not need to wait for an SMS message or a code from an application, either of which could potentially be intercepted by an attacker.

In an update to Microsoft’s email security service, Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection, the software giant is making it tougher for dangerous links within email messages to escape attention.

The company has announced the availability of a new feature dubbed URL Detonation, which builds on the product’s existing URL reputation analysis and scanning capabilities to alert users when a suspicious link appears in an email.

“If the user clicks a link during the scan, the message ‘This link is being scanned’ is displayed,” explained the Microsoft Office 365 in a blog post. “If the link is identified as malicious after the scan, a pop-window opens notifying the user that the file is malicious and warns the user against opening it.”

In the event users ignore the warning and click on dangerous URLs, administrators can mitigate the damage by setting a Safe Links tracking policy within Advanced Threat Protection.

The emerging world of serverless computing could soon see another viable option if the open-source Fission effort that Platform9 is helping to lead is successful. Serverless computing, also sometimes referred to as event driven programming, is a model of cloud services deployment that doesn’t require dedicated servers to run application functions.

Platform9 first emerged from stealth mode in August 2014, with the promise of helping to make it easier to manage OpenStack based cloud deployments.

Platform9 has continued to evolve its management platform and has officially announced the general availability of its managed Kubernetes service, which first entered into beta in July 2016. The evolving open-source Fission effort makes use of Kubernetes to enable serverless capabilities for users.

Article source: http://www.eweek.com/video/yahoo-topped-record-list-of-data-breaches-in-2016-report-finds.html?=small-video-widget

,

No Comments